Game 1 vs St Louis

Welcome to the first game charts post of the season. Normally, I just post the game charts and write three players that performed well at even strength play and three players that performed poorly. However, I’m going to go into more detail explaining each chart. I will then be able to use this post as a template for new people to reference who might not understand  future game charts.

Let’s get started.

I always post my three up and three down first. By looking over the numbers, I pick which three players positively affected the games and which players negatively affected the game. This will be chosen by even strength shot based stats only. There is no point in me telling you the guy who scored two goals and one assist did well. You know this already. What you might not know is which players best impacted the game. Who were the players on the ice when Chicago outshot the opponent? Who were the players that were getting shelled by the opponent and giving up many shots? This is where I come in with my three up and three down. It will show which players did well or poorly that you might not have noticed.   

Three up / Three down

  • 👍Toews 
  • 👍Panarin
  • 👍Kruger
  • 👎Anisimov
  • 👎TVR
  • 👎The whole 4th line 

Next, I always post the team stats.

Here we see five stats.

  • Shot Attempts – This includes shots on goal, missed shots on goal, and blocked shot attempts towards the opposition’s net.
  • Shots On Goal – Shot attempts that are either blocked by the goalie or go in the net.
  • Scoring Chance – Shots that have a higher probability of going in the net.
  • High Danger Chance – Shots that occur in the slot right in front of the goalie. These shots have the highest probability of going in the net.
  • Goals – The outcome of shots and scoring chances.

And now the player charts with a general stat description below each.

SHOT GENERATION – (CF60) – This is average team shot attempts for per 60 minutes with a player on the ice. This stat looks at how many shot attempts the team has when a certain player is on the ice. Let’s say Keith plays 30 minutes and was on the ice for 15 Blackhawk shot attempts. Now let’s also say Seabrook plays 20 minutes and was on the ice for 12 Blackhawks shot attempts. If we average both of those numbers out to see what they would be if they both played exactly 60 minutes, we can take the variable of time out of the equation. Keith then would have averaged 30 shots for per 60 minutes, while Seabrook averaged 36 shots for per 60 minutes. When we make time equal, we see that the Blackhawks generated more shots when Seabrook was on the ice compared to Keith. This stat is also know as Corsi for per 60.

SHOT SUPPRESSION – (CA60) – This is average team shot attempts against per 60 minutes with a player on the ice. This stat looks at how many shot attempts the opponent has when a certain player is on the ice. Let’s say Keith plays 30 minutes and was on the ice for 15 Blues shot attempts. Now let’s also say Seabrook plays 20 minutes and was on the ice for 12 Blues shot attempts. If we average both of those numbers out to see what they would be if they both played exactly 60 minutes, we can take the variable of time out of the equation. Keith then would have averaged 30 shots against per 60 minutes, while Seabrook averaged 36 shots against per 60 minutes. When we make time equal, we see that the Blackhawks suppressed more shots when Keith was on the ice compared to Seabrook. This stat is also know as Corsi against per 60.

PUCK POSSESSION PERCENTAGE – (Cf%) – This stat is basically a players shot differential represented as a percentage. It is calculated by taking a players shots for divided by the total number of shots when the player was on the ice. If Duncan Keith is on the ice for 4 Blackhawks shot attempts and 2 Blues shot attempts, his possession percentage would be 67%. This is calculated by taking 4 shots for / (4 shots for + 2 shots against). So 4 shots for / 6 total shots. 4 divided by 6 = 0.67 or 67%. That’s how we determined Keith’s possession was 67%. You see, hockey doesn’t have stats like time in the offensive zone or time in the defensive zone available to the public. There is no way to actually know what percentage of time a team has the puck compared to the opponent. For this reason, we use shots to determine which team is possessing the puck. If Duncan Keith is on the ice for 4 Blackhawks shots and 2 Blues shots, then there is a good chance the Blackhawks are in possession of the puck more than the Blues. To simplify it down, a team has to have the puck in order to shoot it. If the Blackhawks have more shot attempts than the Blues, then we can say the Blackhawks were possessing the puck more than the Blues. No it’s not an exact science, it’s just what the hockey community uses get by. A possession percentage of 50% is considered even. Above 50% indicates the Blackhawks are outshooting the opponent. Under 50% indicates the opponent is outshooting the Blackhawks. Also known as Corsi For% or Cf%

SHOT DIFFERENTIAL – (C +/-) – The teams shot differential when a player or group of players were on the ice. A positive number indicates that players team is outshooting their opponent with the player on the ice. A negative number indicates the opponent is outshooting that players team when the player was on the ice. If Chicago plays St Louis and Duncan Keith has a shot differential of +3, that means the Blackhawks outshot the Blues by three shots when Duncan Keith was on the ice. For this stat, a shot is considered a shot on goal, a shot that goes wide of the net, or a shot that is blocked before reaching the net. This stat is also known as Corsi +/- (C+/-).

SCORING CHANCE DIFFERENTIAL – (SCD) – The teams scoring chance differential when a player or group of players were on the ice. A positive number indicates that players team is out-chancing their opponent with that player on the ice. A negative number indicates the opponent is out-chancing that players team when the player was on the ice. If Chicago plays St Louis and Duncan Keith has a scoring chance differential of +3, that means the Blackhawks had three more scoring chances than the Blues when Duncan Keith was on the ice.

HIGH DANGER SCORING CHANCE DIFFERENTIAL – (SCD) – The teams high Danger scoring chance differential when a player or group of players were on the ice. A positive number indicates that players team is out-chancing their opponent with that player on the ice. A negative number indicates the opponent is out-chancing that players team when the player was on the ice. If Chicago plays St Louis and Duncan Keith has a scoring chance differential of +3, that means the Blackhawks had three more scoring chances than the Blues when Duncan Keith was on the ice.

The amount of playing time each player had.

There it is. Sometimes I post more charts than this, but this is the general template  I use for each game. I will post charts after every game this season, and you can find them on this site in the “Game Viz” tab. Thanks for checking these out. 

Have a great day.